Posts Tagged 'longitudinal database'

Rockwood School District Publishes Student Health Records Online

It seems that the Rockwood School District in St Louis Missouri just can’t take a break. continues to make poor, unconstitutional decisions.

First, in an effort to receive vouchers from the state, schools implemented a “Run for Recess” requiring students run laps around the track before participating in what was left of their 15 minute recess. Next, it was discovered that the district  fingerprints all students without parental consent. Then came the state audit which unveiled what we already knew: the district was funneling millions of dollars to school board president Steve Smith (who later resigned, but not before throwing Superintendent Bruce Borchers under the bus. Borchers will not return to RSD).

The fingerprinting scandal broke when a mother noticed that someone else was eating off of her child’s account. Upon inquiry, she was told that “someone else’s fingerprint must be similar to your son’s”. Huh? Fingerprint. The district refused to comment on the issue, but later published an *opt-out* document for parents to restrict the child from being fingerprinted…but there is no indication anywhere on their website which informs parents of the standard practice. In other words, if the parent is not aware of the fingerprinting of their child, they would have no way of knowing to click on the opt-out link. This also gives the district the opportunity to implement this measure, though unconstitutional, and without parental consent of a minor, by default.

fingerprint opt out (2)

Now it has been discovered that the Rockwood School District has taken upon itself to actually publish student health records online. These records can be found on the district’s “Infinite Campus” site which is a database for all things and anything the district wants on record. Personal information. Information that goes directly into the Longitudinal Database as part of Common Core Standards. You can find all you need and more on the Longitudinal Database, as well as Common Core at Missouri Education Watchdog.

health record (4)

This database, though on a secure webpage, still jeopardizes student privacy rights. Personal information of a minor can not be shared or published without parental consent. RSD was approached on this issue, to which they (per their M.O.) remained silent and refused any comment regarding these publications. This database, of course, may be subject to sale, where another entity would have full access to this information. Worse, this database may also be seized by the federal government as part of  Common Core integration.  It seems that as long as the parents don’t know what is going on, RSD will continue to institute whatever practices they desire, despite the law.

CRPD: The Disabled Newborn Registration Act. . .and the End of Personal Freedom

UPDATE: URGENT!!! Senate set to ratify CRPD 12pm EST, December 4, 2012

 

How many of you have heard of CRPD (more exhaustively known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities)? Probably few of you.  In fact, in a quick google search, of the hundreds of hits endorsing the legislation, not a single one actually had a link to the Bill, or explanation of it’s wording.

Not here: USICD, nor here: National Association or the Deaf, not here: National Federation for the Blind, not even on The Hill …thank goodness Clay Aiken tweeted his support out.

First of all, this is not state legislation, this is not federal legislation…this is a UN treaty agreement.

Article Eleven:

States Parties shall take, in accordance with their obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law and international human rights law, all necessary measures to ensure the protection and safety of persons with disabilities in situations of risk, including situations of armed conflict, humanitarian emergencies and the occurrence of natural disasters.

This, in essence, makes the States the UN’s bitch, for lack of a better term.

Now, why in the world would it be necessary to enter into an agreement with the UN to register at birth and track anyone with disabilities? Why would legislation be written to mandate that all newborns with disabilities have the right to a name?  Why would legislation be written to mandate that all newborns with disabilities have the right to be raised by their birth parents?

Huh?

The answer to this puzzling piece of legislation is directly connected to the longitudinal database system…the final piece of the puzzle. MissouriEducationWatchdog has spent the better part of three years researching and documenting government sanctioned database system.  CRPD is simply one more arm in this system. By documenting people born with disabilities from birth, the government will be able to track that person via school records, medical records, employment history, socio-economic status, political preference, and so on.

Sounds crazy, right? Feel free to research the longitudinal database system for yourself…then take a few days to absorb and wrap your head around it.

In a nutshell, this program collects and tracks data of each individual…it has gone so far to take digital fingerprints of children without legal consent. Based upon the information gathered, government agencies can determine who will be a contribution to society, who will only amount to menial labor, who will live on entitlement programs, disabled persons who can be exploited for government purposes (neat wording for a pat om the back) based upon their accomplishments, and so on.

Yes, all of your information neatly collected in one nice little UN sanctioned package…your childrens’ too.  This is not about better education, it is about surrender of sovereignty…and the worst of it, the government is exploiting disabled persons to further their agenda.


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Jen Ennenbach

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